Carl Quinn

Portrait of Carl Quinn

Carl's interest in music was nurtured at a very young age and he grew up listening to the songs of the traditional ceremonies and of course the social songs of the round dance, hand game, and the pow-wow.


Ancestries: First Nations
Languages: Cree

Albums

Album Cover
Ni Ototem
mp3 clipNi Ototem (707.8K)

Biography

Carl was born in a one room shack at the Saddle Lake Cree Nation. He comes from a family of twelve and has raised a family of his own.

Carl has been a hunter, trapper, farm hand, and construction worker. He has also worked as a human resource consultant. He is a leader for his people and has served on the tribal council for four three year terms, including one term as chief.

Carl's interest in music was nurtured at a very young age and he grew up listening to the songs of the traditional ceremonies and of course the social songs of the round dance, hand game, and the pow-wow. He is a traditional dancer and has attended pow wows throughout North America, both as a dancer and a singer. He sings with the Pisimoyapi drum group.

One of the values Carl has been taught is to assist his people how ever he can and he been able to do this by volunteering with worthwhile community causes like boy scouts, community events, and organizing annual pow wows.

He received his first guitar at the age of fifteen; A big investment for a family that lived below the poverty line. He taught himself to play and began emulating the music of his generation of the late sixties and seventies.
The value of the Cree (Nehiyo) language and its retention for the future generations has been a goal for a Carl and one that he advocates for with zeal and passion. He has worked as translator and developed curriculum so that the Cree language can be utilized in teaching children in their own language. The idea for the Cree album arose out of a need to expand the areas that the Cree language is used, but also, to try and capture the interest of the younger generation. The songs are about tradition, values, and hopefully will serve as a vehicle to promote the Cree language.